Category Archives: Lanzarote

Buda

Buda
Buda

Buda (Marina Puerto Calero, Puerto Calero) — The atmosphere in the Buda is very relaxing. It is a bar that appeals to those generally between the ages of 35-40 years and usually tends to be tourists staying in Puerto Calero or in the nearby tourist resort of Puerto Del Carmen. The relaxation becomes fun and debauchery during the nights of Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The back room usually serves as the dance floor however it does not have a cocktail bar as does the Cuatro Luna’s and we do feel that it should be taken into regards. It remarkably achieves much appeal in all areas. Here´s why… It has a good choice of liquors (at a good price too) and has a brief but selective list of champagnes and wines. Generally, the background music will be that of disco, chill out, mixed pop, rock etc….

Aeronautical Museum

Aeronautical Museum
Aeronautical Museum

Aeronautical Museum (Av. De la Playa Honda 163, Lanzarote Airport) – this museum (located near a one-time wing of the island’s airport) traces the early years of aviation in Lanzarote (French seaplanes being the first aircraft to reach this island in 1919). Visitors will be surprised to see that the Graf Zeppelin airship used to pass over Lanzarote to drop off mail by parachute on its voyage to America. Still, the first airport wasn’t built in Lanzarote until the 1940s.

When tourism started growing in Lanzarote in the 1970s, the island’s present-day airport was moved elsewhere to accommodate the passenger traffic that existed ever since. Lots of memorabilia from the airport is on display including pilots log books and old machinery. There were two boards listing the years where individual photographs were pinned depicting historical images and magic moments like the visits from Concorde. Admission: free. Hours: 10:00 am – 2:00 pm (Monday-Saturday).

Arrecife

Arrecife
Arrecife

Arrecife (city) – located on the central east coast of Lanzarote, Arrecife is the island’s main city, and has been its capital since 1852. Since the 1500s, Its harbor has acted as a port of call for ships in transit from Spain to the Americas. The city’s name derives from the Spanish word for “reef” and refers to the volcanic rock formations that lie out to sea and protect the picturesque harbor. Arrecife started life as a small fishing village way back in the 15th century until it grew into its current status as the island’s capital. Today, half of Lanzarote’s local population resides at Arrecife, and is well known as a haven for shoppers. With streets lined with boutiques, high-end retail outlets selling designer labels and bargains galore, many people visit Arrecife for its endless shopping possibilities. Look out for the long pedestrian road called Calle Léon y Castillo and a large shopping center.

Arrecife also has its own beach, Playa del Reducto, with golden sand and tepid, tranquil waters. A lovely promenade runs all the way from this area to the city’s second beach, Playa del Cable, which is 1.25 miles (2 km.) further west.

Bozena’s

Bozena’s
Bozena’s

Bozena’s (Calle Teide 6, Puerto del Carmen) –– located in a charming old Canarian house, Bozena’s restaurant combines Polish and Irish cuisine with excellent results. The intimate surroundings and lovely views over the old harbor provide the perfect backdrop for dining. The menu runs from Stroganoff to Polish meatballs to fresh fish of the day and includes a range of vegetarian dishes. All the food is homemade, with generous portions being the norm. There are also delicious homemade desserts to round off a meal.

About Lanzarote

Lanzarote
Lanzarote

The volcanic island of Lanzarote, one of the Canary Islands (off the northwest coast of Africa), was reputedly discovered by Genoese navigator Lancelotto Malcello in 1312, who named this island after himself. However, it wasn’t settled until the 15th century by the Castilians. Due in part to its distance from mainland Spain (1,000 km) and its relative proximity to Morocco and Western Sahara (125 km.), Lanzarote was subject to conquest by the Ottomans in 1585, and by pirate raids during the 17th century (including one by Walter Raleigh in 1616).

Due to heavy volcanic activity (resulting in the creation of as many as 32 volcanoes on the island during the early 1700s, the accompanying destruction of many local towns) as well as drought affecting Lanzarote in 1768, much of the local population would relocate to places like Cuba and other Spanish colonies in the Americas by the end of the 18th century. In 1812, Lanzarote and the rest of the Canary Islands officially became a province of Spain. During the 1920s, Lanzarote became part of the province of Las Palmas (Gran Canaria island).

Given Lanzarote’s limited agricultural output (with the volcanic soil proving useful for grape and wine production), the island launched its successful bid in tourism in 1966 with the opening of the passenger terminal of Lanzarote Airport, along with the opening of the Fariones Hotel at the town of Puerto del Carmen. With the current local population at around 130,000 residents, Lanzarote’s population easily doubles during the tourist season with vacationers from various European countries.