Category Archives: Denmark

Arbejdermuseet

Arbejdermuseet
Arbejdermuseet

Arbejdermuseet (Rømersgade 22, Copenhagen) — this museum has exhibits on the Danish working class (explaining the museum’s name, which means “Workers’ Museum). The periods covered range from the 1870s to today, with exhibits showing actual replicas of a working family’s living quarters (furniture, home décor, etc.) from eras like the 1950s (where American-style consumerism started to take hold in Denmark). Foreigners get insight on the evolution of modern life in Denmark.
Admission: 90 DKK (Adult), 65 DKK (Students & visitors ages 18-25), Children under 18: free. Hours: 10 am – 4 pm daily; 10 am – 7 pm (Wednesday).

Field’s

Field’s
Field’s

Field’s (E20 Frakørsel, Exit 19, Arne Jacobsen Alle 12, Ørestad, Copenhagen) – this is the largest shopping mall not just in Denmark, but anywhere in Scandinavia. Over 140 retail stores are located here (carrying apparel, shoes, accessories, and other items), such as Adidas, Aldo, Ecco, Foot Locker, H&M, Nike, Superdry, Toys R’ Us, and Zara. There’s also a Magasin store, featuring the very best in fashion and home designs. Natuzzi represents the best of Italian home furnishings and décor. There’s also a variety of restaurants and cafés, a children’s playland, a Fun Golf course and much more.

Den Røde Cottage

Den Røde Cottage
Den Røde Cottage

Den Røde Cottage (Strandvejen 550, Copenhagen) – this restaurant, which received a Michelin star in 2013, offers fine meals by the water in a scenic setting. Diners are given the option of 3 to 8-course meals (reputedly at reasonable prices, given its Michelin standing). Dishes served here include dried Danish ham, forest mushrooms and elderberry; fried squid, sweet apple and pickled seaweed; and Pan fried pike – pearch, cabbage, almonds and smoked bacon. In addition, it also has an impressive wine list.

Aquadome

Aquadome
Aquadome

Aquadome (Ellehammers Allé 3, Billund) – within Lalandia Billund (the same town where Legoland is located), this is Scandinavia’s largest Aquadome. Visitors can enjoy the tropical climate in the huge Aquadome with water activities in all kinds and lots of fun for young and old. Revel in the speed and excitement of the Tornado and Octopus Racer water slides, and enjoy poolside life while the youngest members of the family have fun with the many water activities in the children’s areas and activity pools.
Under other theme parks, this one acts as a full-fledged vacation destination, complete with resort accommodations onsite. Prospective patrons should consult Lalandia’s website for full details on vacation packages: www.lalandia.dk

Bakken KBH

Bakken KBH
Bakken KBH

Bakken KBH (Flaesketorvet 19, Copenhagen) – the one thing that Copenhagen and New York have in common is that they both have a lively club-friendly area called the “Meatpacking District”. Copenhagen’s version of that neighborhood has, among other venues, “Bakken KBH”. That nightspot, which caters to the local 20-something college crowd, has “Brandy Thursdays” events (when DJing sessions of mostly local electronic dance music is often held), while live music acts are booked during the weekends.

Amalienborg Palace

Amalienborg Palace
Amalienborg Palace

Amalienborg Palace (Danish Royal Palace) (Amalienborg, Copenhagen) – this is the main residence of the Queen of Denmark. Amalienborg is made up of four identical rococo style buildings – The Christian VII’s Palace is also known as Moltke’s Palace, The Christian VIII’s Palace is also known as Levetzau’s Palace, The Frederik VIII’s Palace is also known as Brockdorff’s Palace and The Christian IX’s Palace or Schack’s Palace –spread around the octagonal courtyard. Amalienborg is considered one of the greatest works of Danish Rococo architecture and was constructed in the 1700’s.

Nowadays, audiences can see two of the four palaces: Christian VIII’s palace, which is partially organized as a museum for the Glücksburg royal family, and Christian VII’s palace, which is used by the Queen for receiving guests and official representatives.

In the middle of the courtyard there is an equestrian statue of King Frederik V and it is considered one of the most outstanding equestrian statues in the world. The statue was unveiled in 1771 – five years after King Frederik V’s death in 1766.

Admission: 95 DKK (Adult), 80 DKK (Students), Children under 18: Hours: Opening hours vary. Check the Museum’s website for an updated schedule: http://dkks.dk

About Denmark

Denmark
Denmark

The Kingdom of Denmark, consisting of mainland Denmark, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland, is best remembered by historians for its status as the one-time home of Scandinavia’s Vikings (going as far back as the 8th century AD). The word ‘Denmark’ dates back to the Viking age and is carved on the famous Jelling Stone from around 900 AD.

Since then, Denmark went through political unions with nearby Norway and Sweden, as well as periodic conflicts with them. During the Napoleonic Wars (early 1800s), Denmark asserted a trade policy of neutrality and trade with both France & Britain, which resulted in the Danish-British Gunboat War – a major setback for both Denmark and nearby Norway at that time. Unlike other European countries, which had varying success of territorial expansion in other parts of the world, especially Africa, Denmark only had a few overseas possessions by the time it became a constitutional monarchy in the mid-19th century: Danish Gold Coast (Ghana) (until 1850), Danish India (Tranquebar) (until 1869), and Danish West Indies (until 1917, when they became the U.S. Virgin Islands). With Denmark staying out of World War I, it was occupied by Nazi Germany during World War II. Afterwards, it joined NATO and became a founding member of the European Union (EU) (although it does not use the Euro as its official currency).

These days, Denmark is a growing tourism destination – attracting visitors from nearby countries like Germany, the Netherlands, and its Scandinavian neighbors (Sweden, Norway). With tourism just being over 8% of Denmark’s GDP, the country attracts nearly 9 million visitors a year. The lively historic city of Copenhagen (the nation’s capital) is a major draw for tourists. The maintenance of many medieval-era buildings in Copenhagen and other parts of the country, as well as the fame that Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen earned internationally, and the global popularity that toymaker Lego blocks have long enjoyed among school children, have helped build up Denmark’s image as a “fairytale country”.

The Danish capital is a major draw for tourists. The maintenance of many medieval-era buildings in Copenhagen and other parts of the country, as well as the fame that Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen earned internationally, and the global popularity that toymaker Lego blocks have long enjoyed among school children, have helped build up Denmark’s image as a “fairytale country”.